March Discussion: Across the Universe

young-adulters-book-club-across-the-universe-beth-revis

Well! That turned out to be a pleasant surprise. For the first, oh, three quarters of the book, I was banging my head against a wall, wondering why I was wasting my time. But then, around page 300, things started to pick up, and I raced through the last 100 pages quite happily.

There are so many things to talk about with this one! Let’s get started. Obviously, here by spoilers, so if you haven’t finished the book and you care about that sort of thing, maybe come back later.

  • I felt so bad for Amy when she realized that she was not going to see her parents again. On top of knowing that she would never see earth again. That is just cruel! Talk about leaving your entire life behind.
  • What do you think about the ethics of what Eldest did? The ethics of treating a whole population as though they were animals, keeping them as domesticated and docile as possible, even controlling their reproduction. The whole idea was so skeevy to me. (Also, I’m no prude, but the whole Season made me vastly uncomfortable.) And that they were called Feeders?! That is some next level creepy stuff. But do you think that there was some merit to Eldest’s methods? Elder seems to think so, and I am not sure that I entirely disagree. Their situation is a strange and precarious one: a population stuck on a ship, nowhere to go, no ending in sight. That’s tough. But I also wonder what would have happened if they didn’t know about Sol-Earth OR Centauri-Earth. If they just knew that this was their lives and that was that. Would that have been better?
  • Not to brag or anything, but I totally called that Orion was the previous Elder (just ask my mama!). I did think the cloning aspect was a bit much, but it does bring up some interesting questions about cloning and whether or not it is possible for a situation like that to arise, where three people with the exact same DNA turn out to be so different. I don’t know enough about DNA to even begin to make a hypothesis about it, but I am interested.
  • Harley. Broke my heart. That is all.
  • I actually think I might read the rest of the series! The me of even yesterday would be shocked, but there you have it. Across the Universe actually turned out to be as good as I was expecting, despite a really lackluster beginning.

AND NOW! Over to you guys. What are your thoughts?

(Also, vote for next month’s book selection here. Remember, if you don’t vote, you can’t complain about what we read!)

March Discussion: Across the Universe

one poem and three haikus

i. I am/not my body

it is me and I am it

but I am more

and less.

I am flesh and bone

and blood

AND

heart and soul

and mind.

I think,

therefore I am,

I breathe,

therefore I think,

or

I think,

therefore I breathe.

I am hips

and breasts

and thighs

and labia.

I am loves

and hopes

and hatred

and fear.

I am

but I am not.

I am

also/and

not

either/or.

 

I am/not my body;

I am so much more.

 

ii.

my mind is a cage

of monkeys, rattling

against my skull.

***

winter snaps in half,

parting to make way for

the stems of spring.

***

night ticks around me,

still but for the relentless

passage of time.

 

 

 

 

Which is your favorite? I think mine is #2.

one poem and three haikus

How Not to Be a Writer

how-to-not-be-a-writer-becoming-jessica

  1. Never write. Anything. Ever. But if you do happen to break this first and most integral rule, make sure that you at least follow the next four without fail.
  2. Remember that whatever you write absolutely must be perfect. And brilliant. And stunningly original. It must make everyone who even glimpses the title weep over the emotional resonance of it. It also must make you millions, and very, VERY famous.
  3. Care, deeply and desperately, about what every single person in the world thinks about you and your writing. It is essential to your self-worth.
  4. Never try to be published. That’s so gauche. You must be discovered by accident, preferably by someone stumbling upon one of your throwaway, scribbled poems on a paper napkin. No name, of course, but they were so enchanted by your unusual way with words that they spent six months and a small fortune tracking you down.
  5. Give in to fear. Fear knows best. And whatever you do, never ever try anything new, for God’s sake.
  6. And play it again, kids, once more with feeling: the Golden Rule of How to Not be a Writer is never ever write. 
How Not to Be a Writer

March Book Club: Across the Universe by Beth Revis

Hello, my beautiful young Adulters! I am so pleased to announce (late, my bad) that our book club selection for March is Across the Universe by Beth Revis. This is something that is totally different from anything we have read so far (cryogenically frozen people?! spaceships?! murder?!), and I can’t wait to dive in!

young-adulters-book-club-across-the-universe-beth-revis

One of the responses that I received to my book club survey (which you can find here if you haven’t done it yet) was that it would be nice to have a place to comment on and discuss the book as we are all reading it, not just at the end of the month. So this is an experiment: I am going to post an announcement post at the beginning of each month, where you all can talk about your thoughts and experience of the book as you read it, as well as a discussion post at the end of each month, and we’ll see how it goes! Let me know what you think of it, and happy reading! 🙂

March Book Club: Across the Universe by Beth Revis